Tag Archives: Erik Demaine

Marc Chamberland, Math Fonts, and Congruent Triangles

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch!

Marc Chamberland

Marc Chamberland

Up first, a follow up to our post about the World Cup a while back. We received an email from Marc Chamberland linking us to a nice little video (below) about World Cup Balls and their various properties. You may remember seeing Marc’s mathematical art in this post. Below you can see another nice piece that was included in the mathematical art exhibit at the 2013 Joint Mathematics Meetings. Click for a nice description of the math puzzle it solves.  (in short: What’s the area of the red square?)

"Inner Square" by Marc Chamberland

“Inner Square” by Marc Chamberland

Marc is a math professor at Grinnell College. In March of 2014 (3-14?) he began working on Tipping Point Math, a youtube channel full of videos showing “math as you never imagined.” I encourage you to find something nice there. For now, here’s that video about World Cup Balls I promised you.

A font based on glass bending

A font based on glass bending

Up next are some nifty, fun fonts based on mathematics. Erik Demaine is no stranger to Math Munch readers, and it’s no wonder why. His stuff is clever and downright intriguing. He and his father Martin published a very interesting paper last April about a series of mathematical typefaces they’ve created over the course of their last decade of research and play.

A Conveyor Belt Font by Erik and Martin Demaine

A conveyor belt typeface by Erik and Martin Demaine

Their paper was published to the arXiv (pronounced “archive”) where it is publicly available.  You can read it here. Or, if you like something slightly more plain-language, here’s a nice review over on medium.com.

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The 4051 Tektronix Graphics Terminal

The 4051 Tektronix Graphics Terminal

Finally, I want to share a sleepy little video called “Congruent Triangles.”  I like to think of it as a slice of mathematical cultural history. This film was made in 1977 on an early computer called a Tektronix 4051 Graphics Terminal. It was made by Bruce and Katherine Cornwell as part of a series of mathematical videos. The way the shapes move and deform to present the ideas and connect the pieces together is so very cool. I also love the choice of music. It tells you something about what math was like for people then. I’d say sort of “groovy.”

Screen Shot 2014-09-15 at 9.22.09 PMThere’s more to the story and many more cool videos to enjoy.  You can look forward to seeing more from the Cornwells, but for now, enjoy this one video and do some hunting on your own if you’re interested.  That’s called “research.”

Bon appetit!