Wordless Videos, isthisprime, and Fan Chung Graham

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch! For the final Thursday of May, we’ll be looking back at some of this month’s posts from our Facebook page. We’ll see some wordless videos by The Global Math Project, look at a prime number quiz game, and meet Fan Chung Graham, one of the world’s leading mathematicians.

I don’t know much about The Global Math Project, but I know James Tanton is involved, and that is always a good thing. (Remember his Exploding Dots?) Well, they’ve posted a couple of wonderful videos featuring Tanton’s “math without words.” Need I say more? See for yourself.

If you like those, here are some more math without words from Tanton’s website.

Up next is a neat little thing by Christian Lawson-Perfect from The Aperiodical. Christian bought isthisprime.com and set up a little quiz game. Click over and see for yourself how it goes… I’ll wait… click below…

Screen Shot 2016-05-25 at 8.52.14 PM

It’s good practice for divisibility tests and getting your prime recognition up, but I suppose it’s not all that mathematical, is it? But Christian did something interesting. He recorded data from all the games played, and he wrote a summary of the results. I love all the charts and graphs in there. The one below shows how likely a number is to be missed by players.

Screen Shot 2016-05-25 at 9.01.48 PM

Finally, I hadn’t heard of Fan Chung-Graham until I found an interview of her posted on Facebook. She is one of the world’s leading mathematicians in several fields, and though she recently retired, she still conducts some research. The interview is a little academic, but it’s still nice to get to know such a talented mathematician.

fan1

Well that wraps up the week and month. I hope you’ve found some tasty math.  Have a great week and bon appetite!

2 responses »

  1. I saw the second video and it really got me thinking if the last circle would work. What I notice is that each time to join the dots (number of dots) and multiple by 2 and we can see how many numbers there is inside the circle. It is very interesting in the graph how most people get mistakes in bigger numbers for the prime than smaller numbers because there are not used to practice those numbers. I enjoy this post because they have different interpretation and how they got the answer.

  2. Pingback: Maria Chudnovsky, Puzzlebomb, and Some Futility | Math Munch

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