Tag Archives: recreational mathematics

Pi Digit, Pi Patterns, and Pi Day Anthem

pivolant1

Painting by Renée Othot for Simon Plouffe’s birthday.

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch!

It’s here—the Pi Day of the Century happens on Saturday: 3-14-15!

How will you celebrate? You might check to see if there are any festivities happening in your area. There might be an event at a library, museum, school, or university near you.

(Here are some pi day events in NYC, Baltimore, San Francisco, Philadelphia, Houston, and Charlotte.)

 

John Conway at the pi recitation contest in Princeton.

John Conway at the pi recitation contest in Princeton.

There’s a huge celebration here in Princeton—in part because Pi Day is also Albert Einstein’s birthday, and Albert lived in Princeton for the last 22 years of his life. One event involves kids reciting digits of pi and and is hosted by John Conway and his son, a two-time winner of the contest. I’m looking forward to attending! But as has been noted, memorizing digits of pi isn’t the most mathematical of activities. As Evelyn Lamb relays,

I do feel compelled to point out that besides base 10 being an arbitrary way of representing pi, one of the reasons I’m not fond of digit reciting contests is that, to steal an analogy I read somewhere, memorizing digits of pi is to math as memorizing the order of letters in Robert Frost’s poems is to literature. It’s not an intellectually meaningful activity.

I haven’t memorized very many digits of pi, but I have memorized a digit of pi that no one else has. Ever. In the history of the world. Probably no one has ever even thought about this digit of pi.

And you can have your own secret digit, too—all thanks to Simon Plouffe‘s amazing formula.

plouffe

Simon’s formula shows that pi can be calculated chunk by chunk in base 16 (or hexadecimal). A single digit of pi can be plucked out of the number without calculating the ones that come before it.

Wikipedia observes:

The discovery of this formula came as a surprise. For centuries it had been assumed that there was no way to compute the nth digit of π without calculating all of the preceding n − 1 digits.

Check out some of Simon's math art!

Check out some of Simon’s math art!

Simon is a mathematician who was born in Quebec. In addition to his work on the digits of irrational numbers, he also helped Neil Sloane with his Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences, which soon online and became the OEIS (previously). Simon is currently a Trustee of the OEIS Foundation.

There is a wonderful article by Simon and his colleagues David Bailey, Jonathan Borwein, and Peter Borwein called The Quest for Pi. They describe the history of the computation of digits of pi, as well as a description of the discovery of their digit-plucking formula.

According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the most digits that someone has memorized and recited is 67,890. Unofficial records go up to 100,000 digit. So just to be safe, I’ve used an algorithm by Fabrice Bellard based on Simon’s formula to calculate the 314159th digit of pi. (Details here and here.) No one in the world has this digit of pi memorized except for me.

Ready to hear my secret digit of pi? Lean in and I’ll whisper it to you.

The 314159th digit of pi is…7. But let’s keep that just between you and me!

And just to be sure, I used this website to verify the 314159th digit. You can use the site to try to find any digit sequence in the first 200 million digits of pi.

Aziz and Peter's patterns.

Aziz & Peter’s patterns.

Next up: we met Aziz Inan in last week’s post. This week, in honor of Pi Day, check out some of the numerical coincidences Aziz has discovered in the early digits in pi. Aziz and his colleague Peter Osterberg wrote an article about their findings. By themselves, these observations are nifty little patterns. Maybe you’ll find some more of your own. (This kind of thing reminds me of the Strong Law of Small Numbers.) As Aziz and Peter note at the end of the article, perhaps the study of such little patterns will one day help to show that pi is a normal number.

And last up this week, to get your jam on as Saturday approaches, here’s the brand new Pi Day Anthem by the recently featured John Sims and the inimitable Vi Hart.

Bon appetit!

Zentangle, Graph Paper, and Pancake Art

My recent doodling.

Some recent doodling, by me.

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch!

As you start a new school year, you might be looking for some new mathy doodle games to play in the margins of your notebooks. Doodling helps me to listen sometimes, and I love making neat patterns. I especially like seeing what new shapes I can make.

This summer I was very happy to run across Zentangle®—”an easy-to-learn, relaxing, and fun way to create beautiful images by drawing structured patterns.” I’ve learned a lot about Zentangle from a blog called Tangle Bucket by Sandy Hunter. She shares how to doodle snircles, snafoozles, and oodles. There’s a whole dictionary of zentangle shapes over at tanglepatterns.com.

My favorite idea in Zentangle is trying to combine two kinds of designs. Sometimes this is described as one pattern “versus” another one. For instance, check out these:

RPvsA RIvsJ

Maybe you’ll pick some tangle patterns to combine with each other. If you try some, maybe you’ll share them in our Readers’ Gallery.

Sandy writes:

It’s so true that the more I tangle, the more I see the potential in patterns all around me. I catch myself mentally deconstructing them (whether I want to or not) to figure out if they can be broken down into simple steps without too much effort. That’s the trademark of a good tangle pattern.

Try some of Sandy’s weekly challenges, or check out Tiffany Lovering’s time-lapse videos—here’s one with music and one with an interview. Can you learn the names of any of the shapes she creates? I spy a Rick’s Paradox. There are lots of ways to begin zentangling—I hope you enjoy giving it a try.

Squares and dots and crosses, oh my!

Squares & dots & crosses, oh my!

If zentangling is too freeform for your doodling tastes, then let me share with you one of my longtime favorite websites. I’ve used it for years to help me to do math and to teach math, and it’s great for math doodling, too. I might even call it a trusty friend, one that I met one day through the simple online search: “free online graph paper”.

That’s right, it’s Free Online Graph Paper.

Something I love about the site is that it lets you design different aspects of your graph paper. Then you can print it out. First you get to decide what kind of grid you would like: square? triangular? circular? Then you get to tinker with lots of variables, like how big the grid cells are, how dark the lines are, and what color they are. And more!

Free Online Graph Paper was created by Kevin MacLeod, who composes music and shares it for free. That way other people can use it for creative projects. That’s really awesome! I enjoyed listening to Kevin’s “Winner Winner“. It’s always good to be reminded that everything you use or enjoy was almost certainly made by a person—including custom graph paper websites!

A 7/3 star spirocake.

A 7/3 star spirocake.

Last up this week is some doodly math that you can really munch on. Everyone knows that breakfast is the most important meal of the day and that the most important food group is roulette curves.

To get your daily recommended allowance of groovy math, look no further than the edible doodles of Nathan Shields and his family over at Saipancakes.

I can wait until the Shields family tackles the cissoid of Diocles.

Bon appetit!

The World Cup Group Stage, Math at First Sight, and Geokone

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch! We’ve got some World Cup math from a tremendous recreational mathematics blog and a new mathematical art tool. Get ready to dig in!

Brazuca: The 2014 World Cup Ball

Brazuca: The 2014 World Cup Ball

I’ve been meaning to share the really fantastic Puzzle Zapper Blog, because it’s so full of cool ideas, but the timing is perfect, because IT’S WORLD CUP TIME!!! and the most recent post is about the math of the world cup group stage! It’s called “World Cup Group Scores, and “Birthday Paradox” Paradoxes,” and I hope you’ll give it a read. (For some background on the Birthday Paradox, watch this Numberphile video called 23 and Football Birthdays.)

The thing that got me interested in the article was actually just this chart. I think it’s really cool, probably because I always find myself two games through the group stage, thinking of all the possible outcomes. If you do nothing else with this article, come to understand this chart. I was kind of surprised how many possible outcomes there are.

All Possible World Cup Group Stage Results

All Possible World Cup Group Stage Results

Long story short (though you should read the long story), there’s about a 40% chance that all 8 world cup groups will finish with different scores.

Alexandre Owen Muñiz, Author of Puzzle Zapper.  (click for an interview video about Alexandre's interactive fiction)

Alexandre Owen Muñiz, Author of Puzzle Zapper.  (click for an interview video about Alexandre’s interactive fiction)

Puzzle Zapper is the recreational mathematics blog of Alexandre Owen Muñiz. You can also find much of his work on his Math at First Sight site. He has a lot of great stuff with polyominoes and other polyforms (see the nifty pics below). Alexandre is also a writer of interactive fiction, which is basically a sort of text-based video game. Click on Alexandre’s picture to learn more.

The Complete Set of "Hinged Tetriamonds"

The complete set of “hinged tetrominoes”

A lovely family portrait of the hinged tetriamonds.

A lovely, symmetric family portrait of the “hinged tetriamonds”

I hope you’ll poke around Alexandre’s site and find something interesting to learn about.

For our last item this week, I’ve decided to share a new mathematical art tool called Geokone. This app is a recursive, parametric drawing tool. It’s recursive, because it is based on a repeating structure, similar to those exhibited by fractals, and it’s parametric, because the tool bar on the right has a number of parameters that you can change to alter the image. The artistic creation is in playing with the parameter values and deciding what is pleasing. Below are some examples I created and exported.

geokone2 geokone1

geokone3

I have to say, Geokone is not the easiest thing in the world to use, but if you spend some time playing AND thinking, you can almost certainly figure some things out! As always, if you make something cool, please email it to us!

Now go create something!  Click to go to Geokone.net.

I hope you find something tasty this week. Bon appetit!