Author Archives: Paul Salomon

2048, 2584, and variations on a theme

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch! It’s a week of mathematical games, including a devilish little game and variations on the theme.

2048

2048

First up, check out this simple little game called 2048. Really, you must go try that game before reading on.

Gabriele Cirulli

Gabriele Cirulli

2048 was created by Gabriele Cirulli, a 20-year old who lives in northern Italy. He was inspired by a couple of very similar games called 1024 and threes, and he wanted to see if he could code a game from scratch. Nice work, Gabriele! (Stay tuned for a Q&A with Gabriele. Coming soon.)

The first time I played, I thought randomly moving the pieces around would work as well as anything, but wow was I wrong. Give it a try and see how far you get. Now watch how this AI (artificial intelligence) computer program plays 2048. You’ll probably notice some patterns that will help you play on your own.

A beautiful chain of powers of two.

A beautiful chain of powers of two.  Can you solve from here?

Did you notice that the smallest tiles are 2′s, and you can only combine matching tiles to create their double? This makes all of the tile values powers of two! (e.g. 2048=2^11) These are the place values for the binary number system! (Did you see our recent post binary?) This has something to do with the long chains that are so useful in solving the game. It’s just like this moment in the marble calculator video.

4, a silly, but interesting little variation

4, a silly, but interesting little variation

If you’re finding 2048 a bit too hard, here’s an easier version.  It’s called 4. It’s a little silly, but it’s also quite interesting. After you make the 4 tile (tying the world record for fewest moves), click “keep going” and see how far you can get. I’ve never been able to get past the 16 tile. Can anyone make the 32? What’s the largest possible tile that can be made in the original 2048 game? Amazingly, someone actually made a 16384 tile!!!

2584, the Fibonacci variant of 2048

2584, the Fibonacci version of 2048

Silly versions aside, there are lots and lots of ways you could alter 2048 to make an interesting game. I wondered about a version where three tiles combined instead of two, but I couldn’t quite figure out how it would work. Can you? (See below.) When I thought about different types of numbers that could combine, I thought of the perfect thing. The Fibonacci numbers!!! 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, … The great thing is that someone else had the same idea, and the game already exists! Take some time now to play 2584, the Fibonacci version of 2048.

2048 and 2584 might seem like very similar games at first, (they’re only 536 apart), but there are some really sneaky and important differences. In the Fibonacci version, a tile doesn’t combine with itself. It has two different kinds of tiles it can match with. I think this makes the game a little easier, but the website says 2584 is more difficult than the original. What do you think?

I have a few more 2048 variations to share with you, as if you didn’t have enough already. These are my favorites:

I hope you dig into some of these games this week. Really think and analyze. If you come up with clever strategies or methods to solve these puzzles, please let us know in the comments. Have a great week, and bon appetit!

Byrne’s Euclid, Helen Friel, and PolygonJazz

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch! We’ve got geometry galore, starting with a series of historical math diagrams and a color update to Euclid’s Elements. Then it’s onto modern day paper artist Helen Friel, and finally a nifty new app that makes music from polygons. Let’s get into it.

Euclid’s “Elements” was written around 300BC. It was the first great compilation of geometric knowledge, broken into 13 books, and it is one of the most influential books of all time. Euclid’s proof of the Pythagorean Theorem may be his most famous proof from the book (and all of mathematics for that matter), and in the pictures below you can see three diagrams of the proof, spanning seven centuries.

Nasir al-Din al-Tusi's 13th century arabic translation of Euclid's proof.

Persian mathematician Nasir al-Din al-Tusi‘s 13th century arabic translation of Euclid’s proof.

Late 14th century English manuscript

A late 14th century English manuscript of Euclid’s “Elements.”

The idea in each picture is that the area of the top two squares adds up exactly to the area of the bottom square. In the picture below, we see the big square broken up into blue and yellow pieces, whose areas are the same as the squares above them.

Oliver Byrne's 1871 color edition

Oliver Byrne’s 1847 color edition.  Click the image for the full proof of the Pythagorean Theorem as presented by Oliver Byrne in 1847.

This color version comes from Oliver Byrne’s 1847 edition, “The First Six Books of the Elements of Euclid, with Coloured Diagrams and Symbols.” (completely available online). I find the diagrams really beautiful and charming. There’s something extremely modern about them (see De Stijl) though they’re more than 150 years old now. See if you can follow his Oliver Byrne’s version of Euclid’s proof. It’s quite short.

Paper Engineer Helen Friel
Paper Engineer Helen Friel

 

“They’re an absolutely beautiful piece of work and far ahead of their time,” said paper engineer Helen Friel. Helen lives in London, and and as part of a charity project, she designed paper sculptures of Oliver Byrne’s diagrams.

Euclid 2 Euclid 4 Euclid 3 Euclid 1

In an interview, she explained, “It’s a more visual and intriguing way to describe the geometry. I love anything that simplifies. I find it very appealing!” In the interview, Helen also talks a little about her attraction to math. “There’s order in straight lines and geometry. Although my job is creative, I use as much logical progression as possible in my work.”

It’s also cool to see Helen’s work side by side with Oliver Byrne‘s, so click for that.

Screen Shot 2014-02-05 at 11.46.00 PM

Click to send us a pic.  Yes, that is a paper camera Helen made.

Downloadable model

Downloadable model

Perhaps the best part in all of this, though, is that you can download Helen’s Pythagaorean Theorem model and make your own! There are plain white version as well as color. If you end up making one, definitely email us a picture, and we’ll show it off here on Math Munch.

Oh, and here’s a quick video documenting the many versions Helen decided not to use.  So cool.

Now, on to our final bite.
PolygonJazz Recently, John Miller sent me an email showing off his new iPad app called PolygonJazz. In the app, you control the starting direction for a ball inside a polygon. Once you start it moving, the ball bounces off the walls, making a sound every time it hits a side. Check out the video below. I noticed something about the speed of the ball. Can you spot it? (PolygonJazz is available for $0.99 on the iTunes store.)

Speaking of bouncing around, here‘s a previous Math Munch featuring some billiards, and here‘s another bouncy post that features one of my favorite juggling routines. Michael Moschen built a gigantic equilateral triangle and juggles silicon balls inside and off of it. As with the app, Michael is utilizing the sound and geometry of the collisions to make something beautiful. It’s quite mesmerizing.

Have a bouncy week, and bon appetit!

Platonic Terrariums, Geometric Decor, and Multiplying Polyhedra

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch! We’ve got some beautiful geometric objects meant to house a plant or decorate your home, as well as a really clever kind of “multiplication chart” relating the Platonic solids to each other.

Icosahedron Terrarium

Icosahedron Terrarium

First up, let’s take a look at some gorgeous glass terrarium models of the Platonic solids. We don’t usually share products here on Math Munch, because we want to make sure you can enjoy the math for free, but these are so beautiful I just had to show you. I’m a sucker for spherical symmetry!

The Turning Triangles Terrarium actually sits on my mantle at home. It’s 20 pieces of triangular glass (with one hinged pane) coming together to make an icosahedron home for a little plant.

Octahedron Terrariums

Octahedron Terrariums

Above you can see a spread of octahedron terrariums, which will have to be my next purchase. Does $29 seem like a lot for one of those? I was kind of shocked to  see prices for other ones that are about 4 times that much. Take a look at the dodecahedron and cube terrariums below. They’re over $100 each, but man are they cool!?

Dodecahedron and Cube Terrariums

Dodecahedron and Cube Terrariums

I love how they stood the cube up on its corner. Did you ever think about how cutting off the corner of a cube creates a little triangle?

Speaking of cutting off corners, that’s called “truncation.” I bet you never realized the soccer ball pattern is a truncated icosahedron. Well it is! And West Elm is selling a pair of really beautiful truncated polyhedra made of Capiz shells. Below are the corner-cut versions of the icosahedron and dodecahedron.

Capiz Shell Truncated Polyhedra

Capiz Shell Truncated Polyhedra

Blue CuboctahedronWhite OctahedronOK, just a couple more. First, I love the blue and white of these two shapes. One correction: the seller calls them an “octahedron”, but they have more than 8 faces. These are actually cuboctahedra. (Can you figure out how many sides they do have?)

Metal Icosidodecahedra

Metal Icosidodecahedra

And lastly, the really cool, metal rhombicosidodecahedron. This is the shape that is used for the Zome construction kit. Check out this video showing a project we did last year. In short, we made a really big version of this out of lots of little ones.

If you end up buying one of these decorative sculptures, let us know. We’d love to see a picture of it in your house.

Finally, this is a really incredible image I found on Pinterest. Can you tell what’s going?

A Platonic solid "multiplication" chart

A Platonic solid “multiplication” chart

It’s set up like a multiplication chart, with the Platonic solids along the top and left edges. In the middle, we get a picture showing how the two shapes might be related to each other. I could (and have) stared at this for hours!

A1

A1

In the A1 position, for example, we have a picture showing that the tetrahedron is the dual of the tetrahedron. That means, when you connect the centers of the faces on the tetrahedron, you get another tetrahedron!

B3

B3

E4

E4

B2

B2

B1

B1

C3

C3

B3 shows that the octhahedron is the dual of the cube. E4 shows that the icosahedron is the dual of the dodecahedron. B2 appears to be a hypercube, and B1 shows the way that a tetrahedron can be made by connecting alternating corners of a cube. It’s a fascinating chart, and I hope you’ll take some time to check it out. Can you figure out what’s going on in C3?

I would love to know where this image came from, but I can’t find anything about it. If you know anything about the origin of the chart, please let us know.

Well that’s it. I hope you found something juicy. Bon appetit!