Tag Archives: diversity

Nautilus, The Riddler, and Brain Pickings

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch!

Sometimes math pops up in places when you aren’t even looking for it. This week I’d like to share three websites that I enjoy. What they have in common is that they all cover a wide range of subjects—astronomy, politics, pop culture—but also host some great math if you know where to look for it.

nautilusFirst up is a site called Nautilus. In their own words, “We are here to tell you about science and its endless connections to our lives.” Each month they publish articles around a theme. This month’s theme is “Heroes.” Included in Nautilus’s mission is discussing mathematics, and you can find their math articles on this page. Here are a few articles to get you started. Read about how Penrose tiles have made the leap from nonrepeating abstraction to the real world—including to kitchen items. Learn about one of math’s beautiful monsters and how it shook the foundations of calculus. Or you might be interested in learning about how a mathematician is using computers to change the way we write proofs.

riddler_4x3_defaultNext, you might think that, since the presidential election is now over, you won’t be heading to Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight quite as often. But do you know about the site’s column called The Riddler? Each week Oliver Roeder shares two puzzles, the newer Riddler Express and the Riddler Classic. Readers can send in their solutions, and some get featured on the website—that could be you! Here are a couple of puzzles to get you started, and you can also check out the full archive. The Puzzle of the Lonesome King asks about the chances that someone will win a prince-or-princess-for-a-day competition. Can You Win This Hot New Game Show? asks you to come up with a winning strategy for a round of Highest Number Wins. And Solve The Puzzle, Stop The Alien Invasion is just what is says on the tin.

brainpickings

The third site I’d like to point you to is Brain Pickings. It’s a wide-ranging buffet of short articles on all kinds of topics, written and curated by Maria Popova. If you search Brain Pickings for math, all kinds of great stuff will pop up. You can read about John ConwayPaul Erdős, Margaret WertheimBlaise Pascal, and more. You’ll find book recommendations, videos, history, and artwork galore. I particularly want to highlight Maria’s article about the trailblazing African American women who helped to put a man on the moon. Their story is told in the book Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly, and the feature film by the same name is coming soon to a theater near you!

I hope you find lots to dig into on these sites. Bon appetit!

Wild Maths, Ambiguous Cylinders, and 228 Women

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch!

You should definitely take some time to explore Wild Maths, a site dedicated to the creative aspects of mathematics. Wild Maths is produced by the Millennium Mathematics Project, which also makes NRICH and Plus.

squareit

I won!

One fun things you’ll find on Wild Maths is a game called Square It! You can play it with a friend or against the computer. The goal is to color dots on a square grid so that you are the first to make a square in your color. It is quite challenging! To the left you’ll find my first victory against the computer after losing the first several matches.

You’ll find lots more on Wild Maths, including an equal averages challenge, a number grid journey, and some video interviews with mathematicians Katie Steckles and Nira Chamberlain. Wild Maths also has a Showcase of work that has been submitted by their readers, much like our own Readers’ Gallery. (We love hearing from you and seeing your creations!)

Next up is a video of an amazing illusion:

Now, I am as big of a fan of squircles as anyone, but this video really threw me for a loop. The illusion just gets crazier and crazier! The illusion was designed by Kokichi Sugihara of Meiji University in Japan. It recently won second place in the Best Illusion of the Year Contest.

We are fortunate that Dave Richeson has hit it out of the park again, this time sharing both an explanation of the mathematics behind the illusion and a paper template you can use to make your own ambiguous cylinder!

PWinmathFinally this week, I’d like to share a fascinating document with you. It is a supplement to a book called Pioneering Women in American Mathematics: The Pre-1940s PhD’s by Judy Green and Jeanne LaDuke.

The supplement gives biographies of all 228 American women who earned their PhD’s in mathematics during the first four decades of the 20th century. You might enjoy checking out this page from the National Museum of American History, which describes some about the origin of the book project.

81-11284.13web

Judy Green, Jeanne LaDuke, and fifteen women who received their PhD’s in math before 1940.

I hope you will find both pleasure and inspiration in reading the stories of these pioneers in American mathematics. I have found them to be a lot of fun to read.

Bon appetit!

Web Applets, Space Fillers, and Sisters

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch!

Recently I’ve been running across tons of neat, slick math applets. I feel like they all go together. What do they have in common? Maybe you’ll be able to tell me.

First up, you can tinker with some planetary gears. Then try out these chorded polygons. And then how about some threaded lines?

plantearygears chords shapes

Ready for some more? Because with these sorts of visualizations, Dan Anderson has been on fire lately. Dan is a high school math teacher in New York state. He and his students had fifteen minutes of fame last year when they investigated whether or not Double Stuf Oreos really have double the stuf.

Here is Dan’s page on OpenProcessing. (Processing is the computer language in which Dan programs his applets.) And check out the images and gifs on Dan’s Tumblr. Here’s a sampling!

tumblr_nm56rdMlvl1uppablo1_r3_400 tumblr_noqxoi8EsC1uppablo1_400 tumblr_nolvf9dSt61uppablo1_400

Dan also coordinates Daily Desmos, which we’ve feature previously. Check out the latest periodic and “obfuscation” challenges!

That’s a chunk of math to chew on already, but we’re just getting started! Next up, check out the space-filling artwork of John Shier.

doublecircles eyes
 fish  hearts

John’s artwork places onto the canvas shapes of smaller and smaller sizes. Notice that the circles below fill in gaps, but they don’t touch each other, they way circles do in an Apollonian gasket.

circle_prog_1B_AnimeYou can learn more about John’s space-filling shapes on this page and find further details in this paper.

Thanks for making us this sweet banner, John!

Thanks for making us this sweet banner, John!

Last up this week, head to this site to watch an awesome trailer of a film about Julia Robinson. The short clip focuses on Julia’s work on Hilbert’s tenth problem. It includes interviews with a number of people who knew Julia, including her sister Constance Reid. Constance wrote extensively about mathematics and mathematicians. I’ve read her biography of Hilbert and can highly recommend it. You can read more about Julia and Constance here and here.

Julia Robinson

Julia Robinson

Julia's sister, Constance Reid

Julia’s sister, Constance Reid

Julia and Constance as young girls.

Julia and Constance as young girls.

You might enjoy visiting the site of the Julia Robinson Mathematics Festival. Check to see if a festival will be hosted in your area sometime soon, or find out how you can run one yourself!

With May wrapped up and June getting started, I hope you have a lot of math to look forward to this summer. Bon appetit!