Tag Archives: applet

Tangent Spaces, Transplant Matches, and Golyhedra

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch!

You might remember our post on Tilman Zitzmann’s project called Geometry Daily. If you haven’t seen it before, go check it out now! It will help you to appreciate Lawrie Cape’s work, which both celebrates and extends the Geometry Daily project. Lawrie’s project is called Tangent Spaces. He makes Tilman’s geometry sketches move!

A box of rays, by Tilman

A box of rays, by Tilman

A box of rays, by Lawrie.

A box of rays, by Lawrie

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Not only do Lawrie’s sketches move, they’re also interactive—you can click on them, and they’ll move in response. All kinds of great mathematical questions can come up when you set a diagram in motion. For instance, I’m wondering what moon patterns are possible to make by dragging my mouse around—and if any are impossible. What questions come up for you as you browse Tangent Spaces?

Next up, Dorry Segev and Sommer Gentry are a doctor and a mathematician. They collaborated on a new system to help sick people get kidney transplants. They are also dance partners and husband and wife. This video shares their amazing, mathematical, and very human story.

Dorry and Sommer’s work involves building graphs, kind of like the game that Paul posted about last week. Thinking about the two of them together has been fun for me. You can read more about the life-saving power of Kidney Paired Donation on optimizedmatch.com.

Last up this week, here’s some very fresh math—discovered in the last 24 hours! Joe O’Rourke is one of my favorite mathematicians. (previously) Joe recently asked whether a golyhedron exists. What’s a golyhedron? It’s the 3D version of a golygon. What’s a golygon? Glad you asked. It’s a grid polygon that has side lengths that grow one by one, from 1 up to some number. Here, a diagram will help:

The smallest golygon. It has sides of lengths 1 through 8.

The smallest golygon. It has sides of lengths 1 through 8.

A golyhedron is like this, but in 3D: a grid shape that has one face of each area from 1 up to some number. After tinkering around some with this new shape idea, Joe conjectured that no golyhedra exist. It’s kind of like coming up with the idea of a unicorn, but then deciding that there aren’t any real ones. But Joseph wasn’t sure, so he shared his golyhedron shape idea on the internet at MathOverflow. Adam P. Goucher read the post, and decided to build a golyhedron himself.

And he found one!

The first ever golyhedron, by Adam P. Goucher

The first ever golyhedron, by Adam P. Goucher

Adam wrote all about the process of discovering his golyhedron in this blog post. I recommend it highly.

And the story and the math don’t stop there! New questions arise—is this the smallest golyhedron? Are there types of sequences of face sizes that can’t be constructed—for instance, what about a sequence of odd numbers? Curious and creative people, new discoveries, and new questions—that’s how math grows.

If this story was up your alley, you might enjoy checking out the story of holyhedra in this previous post.

Bon appetit!

Math Awareness Month, Hexapawn, and Plane Puzzles

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch!

April is Mathematics Awareness Month. So happy Mathematics Awareness Month! This year’s theme is “Mathematics, Magic, and Mystery”. It’s inspired by the fact that 2014 would have marked Martin Gardner’s 100th birthday.

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A few of the mathy morsels that await you this month on mathaware.org!

Each day this month a new piece of magical or mysterious math will be revealed on the MAM site. The mathematical offering for today is a card trick that’s based on the Fibonacci numbers. Dipping into this site from time to time would be a great way for you to have a mathy month.

It is white

It is white’s turn to move. Who will win this Hexapawn game?

Speaking of Martin Gardner, I recently ran across a version of Hexapawn made in the programming language Scratch. Hexapawn is a chess mini-game involving—you guessed it—six pawns. Martin invented it and shared it in his Mathematical Games column in 1962. (Here’s the original column.) The object of the game is to get one of your pawns to the other side of the board or to “lock” the position so that your opponent cannot move. The pawns can move by stepping forward one square or capturing diagonally forward. Simple rules, but winning is trickier than you might think!

The program I found was created by a new Scratcher who goes by the handle “puttering”. On the site he explains:

I’m a dad. I was looking for a good way for my daughters to learn programming and I found Scratch. It turns out to be so much fun that I’ve made some projects myself, when I can get the computer…

puttering's Scratch version of Conway's Game of Life

puttering’s Scratch version of Conway’s Game of Life

Something that’s super cool about puttering’s Hexapawn game is that the program learns from its stratetgy errors and gradually becomes a stronger player as you play more! It’s well worth playing a bunch of games just to see this happen. puttering has other Scratch creations on his page, too—like a solver for the Eight Queens puzzle and a Secret Code Machine. Be sure to check those out, too!

Last up, our friend Nalini Joshi recently travelled to a meeting of the Australian Academy of Science, which led to a little number puzzle.

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What unusual ways of describing a number! Trying to learn about these terms led me to an equally unusual calculator, hosted on the Math Celebrity website. The calculator will show you calculations about the factors of a numbers, as well as lots of categories that your number fits into. Derek Orr of Math Year-Round and I figured out that Nalini’s clues fit with multiple numbers, including 185, 191, and 205. So we needed more clues!

Can you find another number that fits Nalini’s clues? What do you think would be some good additional questions we could ask Nalini? Leave your thoughts in the comments!

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A result from the Number Property Calculator

I hope this post helps you to kick off a great Mathematics Awareness Month. Bon appetit!

Fullerenes, Fibonacci Walks, and a Fourier Toy

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch!

Stan and James

Stan and James

Earlier this month, neuroscientists Stan Schein and James Gayed announced the discovery of a new class of polyhedra. We’ve often posted about Platonic solids here on Math Munch. The shapes that Stan and James found have the same symmetries as the icosahedron and dodecahedron, and they also have all equal edge lengths.

One of Stan and James's shapes, made of equilateral pentagons and hexagons.

One of Stan and James’s shapes, made of equilateral pentagons and hexagons.

These new shapes are examples of fullerenes, a kind of shape named after the geometer, architect, and thinker Buckminster Fuller. In the 1980s, chemists discovered that molecules made of carbon can occur in polyhedral shapes, both in the lab and in nature. Stan and James’s new fullerenes are modifications of some existing shapes first described in 1937 by Michael Goldberg. The faces of Goldberg’s shapes were warped, not flat, and Stan and James showed that flattening can be achieved—thus turning Goldberg’s shapes into true polyhedra—while also having all equal edge lengths. There’s great coverage of Stan and James’s discovery in this article at Science News and a fascinating survey of the media’s coverage of the discovery by Adam Lore on his blog. Adam’s post includes an interview with Stan!

Next up—how much fun is it to find a fractal that’s new to you? That happened to me recently when I ran across the Fibonacci word fractal.

A portion of a Fibonacci word curve.

A portion of a Fibonacci word curve.

Fibonacci “words”—really just strings of 0’s and 1’s—are constructed kind of like the numbers in the Fibonacci sequence. Instead of adding numbers previous numbers to get new ones, we link up—or “concatenate”—previous words. The first few Fibonacci words are 1, 0, 01, 010, 01001, and 01001010. Do you see how new words are made out of the two previous ones?

Here’s a variety of images of Fibonacci word fractals, and you can find more details about the fractal in this article. The infinite Fibonacci word has an entry at the OEIS, and you can find a Fibonacci word necklace on Etsy. Dale Gerdemann, a linguist at the University of Tübingen, has a whole series of videos that show off patterns created out of Fibonacci words. Here is one of my favorites:

Last but not least this week, check out this groovy applet!

Lucas's applet showing the relationship between epicycles and Fourier series

Lucas’s applet showing the relationship between epicycles and Fourier series

A basic layout of Ptolemy's model, including epicycles.

A basic layout of Ptolemy’s model, including epicycles.

Sometime around the year 200 AD, the astronomer Ptolemy proposed a way to describe the motion of the sun, moon, and planets. Here’s a video about his ideas. Ptolemy relied on many years of observations, a new geometrical tool we call “trigonometry”, and a lot of ingenuity. He said that the sun, moon, and planets move around the earth in circles that moved around on other circles—not just cycles, but epicycles. Ptolemy’s model of the universe was incredibly accurate and was state-of-the-art for centuries.

Joseph Fourier

Joseph Fourier

In 1807, Joseph Fourier turned the mathematical world on its head. He showed that periodic functions—curves with a repeated pattern—can be built by adding together a very simple class of curves. Not only this, but he showed that curves created in this way could have breaks and gaps even though they are built out of continuous curves called “sine” and “cosine”. (Sine and cosine are a part of the same trigonometry that Ptolemy helped to found.) Fourier series soon became a powerful tool in mathematics and physics.

A Fourier series that converges to a discontinuous function.

A Fourier series that converges to a discontinuous function.

And then in the early 21st century Lucas Vieira created an applet that combines and sets side-by-side the ideas of Ptolemy and Fourier. And it’s a toy, so you can play with it! What cool designs can you create? We’ve featured some of Lucas’s work in the past. Here is Lucas’s short post about his Fourier toy, including some details about how to use it.

Bon appetit!

Light Bulbs, Lanterns, and Lights Out

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch!

thomas-edison

Edison with his light bulb.

On this day in 1880, Thomas Edison was given a patent for his most famous bright idea—the light bulb.

Edison once said, “Genius is one per cent inspiration, ninety-nine per cent perspiration”—a good reminder that putting in some work is important both in math and in life. He also said, “We don’t know a millionth of one percent about anything.” A humbling thought. Also, based on that quote, it sounds like Edison might have had a use for permilles or even permyraids in addition to percents!

Mike's octahedron.

Mike’s octahedron-in-a-light-buld.

In celebration of this illustrious anniversary, I’d like to share some light mathematical fare relating to, well, light bulbs. For starters, J. Mike Rollins of North Carolina has created each of the Platonic solids inside of light bulbs, ship-in-a-bottle style. Getting just the cube to work took him the better part of twelve hours! Talk about perspiration. Mike has also made a number of lovely Escher-inspired woodcuts. Check ’em out!

Evelyn's Schwartz lantern.

Evelyn’s Schwartz lantern.

Next up is a far-out example from calculus that’s also a good idea for an art project. It’s called the Schwartz lantern. I found out about this amazing object last fall when Evelyn Lamb tweeted and blogged about it.

The big idea of calculus is that we can find exact answers to tough problems by setting up a pattern of approximations that get better and better and then—zoop! take the process to its logical conclusion at infinity. But there’s a catch: you have to be careful about how you set up your pattern!

A "nicely" triangulated cylinder.

A “nicely” triangulated cylinder.

For example, if you take a cylinder and approximate its surface with a bunch of triangles carefully, you’ll end up with a surface that matches the cylinder in shape and size. But if you go about the process in a different way, you can end up with a surface that stays right near the cylinder but that has infinite area. That’s the Schwartz lantern, first proposed by Karl Hermann Amandus Schwarz of Cauchy-Schwartz fame. The infinite area happens because of all the crinkles that this devilish pattern creates. For some delightful technical details about the lantern’s construction, check out Evelyn’s post and this article by Conan Wu.

Maybe you’ll try folding a Schwartz lantern of your own. There’s a template and instructions on Conan’s blog to get you started. You’ll be glowing when you finish it up—especially if you submit a photo of it to our Readers’ Gallery. Even better, how about a video? You could make the internet’s first Schwartz lantern short film!

Robert Torrence and his Lights Out puzzle.

Robert and his Lights Out puzzle.

At the MOVES Conference last fall, Bruce Torrence of Randolf-Macon College gave a talk about the math of Lights Out. Lights Out is a puzzle—a close relative of Ray Ray—that’s played on a square grid. When you push one of the buttons in the grid it switches on or off, and its neighbors do, too. Bruce and his son Robert created an extension of this puzzle to some non-grid graphs. Here’s an article about their work and here’s an applet on the New York Times website where you can play Lights Out on the Peterson graph, among others. You can even create a Lights Out puzzle of your own! If it’s more your style, you can try a version of the original game called All Out on Miniclip.

The original Lights Out handheld game from 1995.

The original Lights Out handheld game from 1995.

There’s a huge collection of Lights Out resources on Jaap’s Puzzle Page (previously), including solution strategies, variations, and some great counting problems. Lights Out and Ray Ray are both examples of what’s called a “sigma-plus game” in the mathematical literature. Just as a bonus, there’s this totally other game called Light Up. I haven’t solved a single puzzle yet, but my limitations shouldn’t stop you from trying. Perspiration!

All this great math work might make you hungry, so…bon appetit!

Tsoro Yematatu, Fano’s Plane, and GIFs

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch!

Board and pieces for tsoro yematatu.

Here’s a little game with a big name: tsoro yematatu. If you enjoyed Paul’s recent post about tic-tac-toe, I think you’ll like tsoro yematatu a lot.

I ran across this game on a website called Behind the Glass. The site is run by the Cincinnati Art Museum. (What is it with me and art museums lately?) The museum uses Behind the Glass to curate many pieces of African art and culture, including four mathematical games that are played in Africa.

The simplest of these is tsoro yematatu. It has its origin in Zimbabwe. Like tic-tac-toe, the goal is to get three of your pieces in a row, but the board is “pinched” and you can move your pieces. Here’s an applet where you can play a modified version of the game against a computer opponent. While the game still feels similar to tic-tac-toe, there are brand-new elements of strategy.

Tsoro yematatu reminds me of one that I played as a kid called Nine Men’s Morris. I learned about it and many other games—including go—from a delightful book called The Book of Classic Board Games. Kat Mangione—a teacher, mom, and game-lover who lives in Tennessee—has compiled a wonderful collection of in-a-row games. And wouldn’t you know, she includes Nine Men’s Morris, tsoro yematatu, tic-tac-toe, and dara—another of the African games from Behind the Glass.

The Fano plane.

The Fano plane.

The board for tsoro yematatu also reminds me of the Fano plane. This mathematical object is very symmetric—even more than meets the eye. Notice that each point is on three lines and that each line passes through three points. The Fano plane is one of many projective planes—mathematical objects that are “pinched” in the sense that they have vanishing points. They are close cousins of perspective drawings, which you can check out in these videos.

Can you invent a game that can be played on the Fano plane?

Closely related to the Fano plane is an object called the Klein quartic. They have the same symmetries—168 of them. Felix Klein discovered not only the Klein quartic and the famous Klein bottle, but also the gorgeous Kleinian groups and the Beltrami-Klein model. He’s one of my biggest mathematical heroes.

The Klein quartic.

The Klein quartic.

This article about the Klein quartic by mathematician John Baez contains some wonderful images. The math gets plenty tough as the article goes on, but in a thoughtfully-written article there is something for everyone. One good way to learn about new mathematics is to read as far as you can into a piece of writing and then to do a little research on the part where you get stuck.

If you’ve enjoyed the animation of the Klein quartic, then I bet my last find this week will be up your alley, too. It’s a Tumblr by David Whyte and Brian Fitzpatrick called Bees & Bombs. David and Brian create some fantastic GIFs that can expand your mathematical imagination.

This one is called Pass ‘Em On. I find it entrancing—there’s so much to see. You can follow individual dots, or hexagons, or triangles. What do you see?

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This one is called Blue Tiles. It makes me wonder what kind of game could be played on a shape-shifting checkerboard. It also reminds me of parquet deformations.

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A few of my other favorites are Spacedots and Dancing Squares. Some of David and Brian’s animations are interactive, like Pointers. They have even made some GIFs that are inspired by Tilman Zitzmann’s work over at Geometry Daily (previously).

I hope you enjoy checking out all of these new variations on some familiar mathematical objects. Bon appetit!

Reflection Sheet – Tsoro Yematatu, Fano’s Plane, and GIFs

MoMA, Pop-Up Books, and A Game of Numbers

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch!

Thank you so much to everyone who participated in our Math Munch “share campaign” over the past two weeks. Over 200 shares were reported and we know that even more sharing happened “under the radar”. Thanks for being our partners in sharing great math experiences and curating the mathematical internet.

Of course, we know that the sharing will continue, even without a “campaign”. Thanks for that, too.

All right, time to share some math. On to the post!

N_JoshiTo kick things off, you might like to check out our brand-new Q&A with Nalini Joshi. A choice quote from Nalini:

In contrast, doing math was entirely different. After trying it for a while, I realized that I could take my time, try alternative beginnings, do one step after another, and get to glimpse all kinds of possibilities along the way.

By Philippe Decrauzat.

By Philippe Decrauzat.

I hope the math munches I share with you this week will help you to “glimpse all kinds of possibilities,” too!

Recently I went to the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City. (Warning: don’t confuse MoMA with MoMath!) On display was an exhibit called Abstract Generation. You can view the pieces of art in the exhibit online.

As I browsed the galley, the sculptures by Tauba Auerbach particularly caught my eye. Here are two of the sculptures she had on display at MoMA:

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Just looking at them, these sculptures are definitely cool. However, they become even cooler when you realize that they are pop-up sculptures! Can you see how the platforms that the sculptures sit on are actually the covers of a book? Neat!

Here’s a video that showcases all of Tauba’s pop-ups in their unfolding glory. Why do you think this series of sculptures is called [2,3]?

This idea of pop-up book math intrigued me, so I started searching around for some more examples. Below you’ll find a video that shows off some incredible geometric pop-ups in action. To see how you can make a pop-up sculpture of your own, check out this how-to video. Both of these videos were created by paper engineer Peter Dahmen.

Taura Auerbach.

Tauba Auerbach.

Tauba got me thinking about math and pop-up books, but there’s even more to see and enjoy on her website! Tauba’s art gives me new ways to connect with and reimagine familiar structures. Remember our post about the six dimensions of color? Tauba created a book that’s a color space atlas! The way that Tauba plays with words in these pieces reminds me both of the word art of Scott Kim and the word puzzles of Douglas Hofstadter. Some of Tauba’s ink-on-paper designs remind me of the work of Chloé Worthington. And Tauba’s piece Componants, Numbers gives me some new insight into Brandon Todd Wilson’s numbers project.

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This piece by Tauba is a Math Munch fave!

For me, both math and art are all about playing with patterns, images, structures, and ideas. Maybe that’s why math and art make such a great combo—because they “play” well together!

Speaking of playing, I’d like to wrap up this week’s post by sharing a game about numbers I ran across recently. It’s called . . . A Game of Numbers! I really like how it combines the structure of arithmetic operations with the strategy of an escape game. A Game of Numbers was designed by a software developer named Joseph Michels for a “rapid” game competition called Ludum Dare. Here’s a Q&A Joseph did about the game.

A Game of Numbers.

A Game of Numbers.

If you enjoy A Game of Numbers, maybe you’ll leave Joseph a comment on his post about the game’s release or drop him an email. And if you enjoy A Game of Numbers, then you’d probably enjoy checking out some of the other games on our games page.

Bon appetit!

PS Tauba also created a musical instrument called an auerglass that requires two people to play. Whooooooa!

Reflection Sheet – MoMA, Pop-Up Books, and A Game of Numbers

MOVES, the Tower of Hanoi, and Mathigon

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch!

MOVESThe Math Munch team just wrapped up attending the first MOVES Conference, which was put on by the Museum of Math in NYC. MOVES is a recreational math conference and stands for Mathematics of Various Entertaining Subjects. Anna coordinated the Family Activities track at the conference and Paul gave a talk about his imbalance problems. I was just there as an attendee and had a blast soaking up wonderful math from some amazing people!

AnnaMOVES PaulMOVES JustinMOVES

Who all was there? Some of our math heroes—and familiar faces on Math Munch—like Erik Demaine, Tanya Khovanova, Tim and Tanya Chartier, and Henry Segerman, just to name just a few. I got to meet and learn from many new people, too! Even though I know it’s true, it still surprises me how big and varied the world of math and mathematicians is.

SuMOVES

Suzanne Dorée at MOVES.

One of my favorite talks at MOVES was given by Suzanne Dorée of Augsburg College. Su spoke about research she did with a former student—Danielle Arett—about the puzzle known as the Tower of Hanoi. You can try out this puzzle yourself with this online applet. The applet also includes some of the puzzle’s history and even some information about how the computer code for the applet was written.

danielle

Danielle Arett

A pice of a Tower of Hanoi graph with three pegs and four disks.

A piece of a Tower of Hanoi graph with three pegs and four disks.

But back to Su and Danielle. If you think of the different Tower of Hanoi puzzle states as dots, and moving a disk as a line connecting two of these dots, then you can make a picture (or graph) of the whole “puzzle space”. Here are some photos of the puzzle space for playing the Tower of Hanoi with four disks. Of course, how big your puzzle space graph is depends on how many disks you use for your puzzle, and you can imagine changing the number of pegs as well. All of these different pictures are given the technical name of Tower of Hanoi graphs. Su and Danielle investigated these graphs and especially ways to color them: how many different colors are needed so that all neighboring dots are different colors?

Images from Su and Danielle's paper. Towers of Hanoi graphs with four pegs.

Images from Su and Danielle’s paper. Tower of Hanoi graphs with four pegs.

 

Su and Danielle showed that even as the number of disks and pegs grows—and the puzzle graphs get very large and complicated—the number of colors required does not increase quickly. In fact, you only ever need as many colors as you have pegs! Su and Danielle wrote up their results and published them as an article in Mathematics Magazine in 2010.

Today Danielle lives in North Dakota and is an analyst at Hartford Funds. She uses math every day to help people to grow and manage their money. Su teaches at Ausburg College in Minnesota where she carries out her belief “that everyone can learn mathematics.”

Do you have a question for Su or Danielle—about their Tower of Hanoi research, about math more generally, or about their careers? If you do, send them to us in the form below for an upcoming Q&A!

UPDATE: We’re no longer accepting questions for Su and Danielle. Their interview will be posted soon! Ask questions of other math people here.

MathigonLast up, here’s a gorgeous website called Mathigon, which someone shared with me recently. It shares a colorful and sweeping view of different fields of mathematics, and there are some interactive parts of the site as well. There are features about graph theory—the field that Su and Danielle worked in—as well as combinatorics and polyhedra. There’s lots to explore!

Bon appetit!