Tag Archives: design

roTopo, de Gua, and Bibi-binary

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch!

Today we’re going to look at a few examples of going “up a dimension”. Our first example is what got me thinking about this theme. It’s a game called roTopo. (If you have trouble getting it to load, try using a different browser.)

 rotopo1.png  rotopo2

Maybe you have played the game B-Cubed. RoTopo is similar—trace through a sequence of squares as they get eliminated one by one. I like B-Cubed because it combines spatial thinking with strategic thinking—planning ahead. Rotopo, with its twists and turns in 3D, stretches a player’s spatial thinking even further. I hope you enjoy giving it a try! Maybe you could design a roTopo level of your own with a drawing or with some blocks.

What else can we find when we look “up a dimension”? Maybe the most famous theorem in all of mathematics is the Pythagorean theorem. There are several ways we might try to take a^2+b^2=c^2 up a dimension. If we start to increase the numbers in the exponents, like a^3+b^3=c^3, we head in the direction of Fermat’s Last Theorem. If we add more terms, like a^2+b^2+c^2=d^2, we can find distances in 3D instead of 2D.


A right tetrahedron—the kind needed for de Gua’s Theorem.

And if those aren’t enough to make you go “wow”, then you need to hear about De Gua’s Theorem. The Pythagorean Theorem relates the sides of a right triangle. De Gua’s Theorem relates the faces of a right tetrahedron. The sum of the squares of the areas of the the three “leg” faces is equal to the square of the area of the “hypotenuse” face. So wild! You can read a proof de Gua’s Theorem here. The theorem is named for the 18th-century French mathematician who presented it to the Paris Academy of Sciences in 1783 (although it was known to others before him). De Gua’s Theorem in turn is a special case of a still more general theorem. Once mathematicians start upping dimensions, the sky is the limit!

Last up: Bibi-binary. No, that’s not the way that Justin Timberlake counts—although that funny thought is why I Googled “bibibinary” in the first place. But when I did, this totally silly number system popped up!


How to count in Bibi-binary.

Well, I guess it’s not the number system that’s silly so much, since it’s actually just hexadecimal. Hexadecimal is like binary, but up a couple of dimensions. The system uses sixteen symbols to represent numbers, just as the decimal system uses ten symbols and binary uses two. What makes Bibi-binary silly, then, is not its logical structure but how it sounds.

There are sixteen syllables in Bibi-binary, which are made from combinations of four consonants and four vowels. Three is “hi” and eight is “ko”. If you want to have three 16’s and eight more—56—that would be “hiko”. As another example, 66319344 is “hidihidihidiho”. Bibi-binary was invented in 1971 by a French singer and actor named Boby Lapointe.

I think it would be fun to learn to count in Bibi-binary. Can you believe that I could find zero (“ho”) videos online of people counting in Bibi-binary? I wonder if any of our readers might enjoy making one…

img_colormapHexadecimal is not just fun and games. It’s also used for making codes to stand for colors, especially in making webpages. Most of Math Munch is either 683D29 or 6AB690, would you believe. You can explore using hexadecimal to name colors in this applet.

You can learn lots more about Bibi-binary on the great website dCode, and you’ll also find an applet there that can convert between decimal and Bibi-binary. DCode has lots of tools related to cryptography (get it?) and other math topics, too.

Do you have any favorite examples of math that goes “up a dimension”? We’d love to hear about them in the comments.

Bibi-bi for now! Bon appetit!


Rectangles, Explosions, and Surreals

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch!

What is 3 x 4?   3 x 4 is 12.

Well, yes. That’s true. But something that’s wonderful about mathematics is that seemingly simple objects and problems can contain immense and surprising wonders.

How many squares can you find in this diagram?

As I’ve mentioned before, the part of mathematics that works on counting problems is called combinatorics. Here are a few examples for you to chew on: How many ways can you scramble up the letters of SILENT? (LISTEN?) How many ways can you place two rooks on a chessboard so that they don’t attack each other? And how many squares can you count in a 3×4 grid?

Here’s one combinatorics problem that I ran across a while ago that results in some wonderful images. Instead of asking about squares in a 3×4 grid, a team at the Dubberly Design Office in San Francisco investigated the question: how many of ways can a 3×4 grid can be partitioned—or broken up—into rectangles? Here are a few examples:

How many different ways to do this do you think there are? Here’s the poster that they designed to show the answer that they found! You can also check out this video of their solution.

In their explanation of their project, the team states that “Design tools are becoming more computation-based; designers are working more closely with programmers; and designers are taking up programming.” Designing the layout of a magazine or website requires both structural and creative thinking. It’s useful to have an idea of what all the possible layouts are so that you can pick just the right one—and math can help you to do it!

If you’d like to try creating a few 3×4 rectangle partitions of your own, you can check out www.3x4grid.com. [Sadly, this page no longer works. See an archive of it here. -JL, 10/2016]

Next up, explosions! I could tell you about the math of the game Minesweeper (you can play it here), or about exploding dice. But the kind of explosion I want to share with you today is what’s called a “combinatorial explosion.” Sometimes a problem that appears to be an only slightly harder variation of an easy problem turns out to be way, way harder. Just how BIG and complicated even simple combinatorics problems can get is the subject of this compelling and also somewhat haunting video.

Donald Knuth

Finally, all of this counting got me thinking about big numbers. Previously we’ve linked to Math Cats, and Wendy has a page where you can learn how to say some really big numbers. But thinking about counting also made me remember an experience I had in middle school where I found out just how big numbers could be! I was in seventh grade when I read this article from the December 1995 issue of Discover Magazine. It’s called “Infinity Plus One, and Other Surreal Numbers” and was written by Polly Shulman. I remember my mind being blown by all of the talk of infinitely-spined aliens and up-arrow notation for naming numbers. Here’s an excerpt:

Mathematicians and precocious five-year-olds have long been fascinated by the endlessness of numbers, and they’ve named the endlessness infinity. Infinity isn’t a number like 1, 2, or 3; it’s hard to say what it is, exactly. It’s even harder to imagine what would happen if you tried to manipulate it using the arithmetic operations that work on numbers. For example, what if you divide it in half? What if you multiply it by 2? Is 1 plus infinity greater than, less than, or the same size as infinity plus 1? What happens if you subtract 1 from it?

After I read this article, John Conway and Donald Knuth became heros of mine. (In college, I had the amazing fortune to have breakfast with Conway one day when he was visiting to give a lecture!) Knuth has a book about surreals that’s the friendliest introduction to the surreal numbers that I know of, and in this video, Vi Hart briefly touches on surreal numbers in discussing proofs that .9 = 1. Boy, would I love to see a great video or online resource that simply and beautifully lays out the surreal numbers in all their glory!

It was fun for me to remember that Discover article. I hope that you, too, run across some mathematics that leaves a seventeen-year impression on you!

Bon appetit!