Tag Archives: computers

SquareRoots, Concave States, and Sea Ice

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch!

The most epic Pi Day of the century will happen in just a few weeks: 3/14/15! I hope you’re getting ready. To help you get into the spirit, check out these quilts.

American Pi.

American Pi.

African American Pi.

African American Pi.

There’s an old joke that “pi is round, not square”—a punchline to the formula for the area of a circle. But in these quilts, we can see that pi really can be square! Each quilt shows the digits of pi in base 3. The quilts are a part of a project called SquareRoots by artist and mathematician John Sims.

John Sims.

John Sims.

There’s lots more to explore and enjoy on John’s website, including a musical interpretation of pi and some fractal trees that he has designed. John studied mathematics as an undergrad at Antioch College and has pursued graduate work at Wesleyan University. He even created a visual math course for artists when he taught at the Ringling College of Art and Design in Florida.

I enjoyed reading several articles (1, 2, 3, 4) about John and his quilts, as well as this interview with John. Here’s one of my favorite quotes from it, in response to “How do you begin a project?”

It can happen in two ways. I usually start with an object, which motivates an idea. That idea connects to other objects and so on, and, at some point, there is a convergence where idea meets form. Or sometimes I am fascinated by an object. Then I will seek to abstract the object into different spatial dimensions.

simstrees

Cellular Forest and Square Root of a Tree, by John Sims.

You can find more of John’s work on his YouTube channel. Check out this video, which features some of John’s music and an art exhibit he curated called Rhythm of Structure.

Next up: Some of our US states are nice and boxy—like Colorado. (Or is it?) Other states have very complicated, very dent-y shapes—way more complicated than the shapes we’re used to seeing in math class.

Which state is the most dent-y? How would you decide?

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West Virginia is pretty dent-y. By driving “across” it, you can pass through many other states along the way.

The mathematical term for dent-y is “concave”. One way you might try to measure the concavity of a state is to see how far outside of the state you can get by moving in a straight line from one point in it to another. For example, you can drive straight from one place in West Virginia to another, and along the way pass through four other states. That’s pretty crazy.

But is it craziest? Is another state even more concave? That’s what this study set out to investigate. Click through to find out their results. And remember that this is just one way to measure how concave a state is. A different way of measuring might give a different answer.

Awesome animal kingdom gerrymandering video!

Awesome animal kingdom gerrymandering video!

This puzzle about the concavity of states is silly and fun, but there’s more here, too. Thinking about the denty-ness of geographic regions is very important to our democracy. After all, someone has to decide where to draw the lines. When regions and districts are carved out in a way that’s unfair to the voters and their interests, that’s called gerrymandering.

Karen Saxe

Karen Saxe.

To find out more about the process of creating congressional districts, you can listen to a talk by Karen Saxe, a math professor at Macalester College. Karen was a part of a committee that worked to draw new congressional districts in Minnesota after the 2010 US Census. (Karen speaks about compactness measures starting here.)

Recently I ran across an announcement for a conference—a conference that was all about the math of sea ice! I never grow tired of learning new and exciting ways that math connects with the world. Check out this video featuring Kenneth Golden, a leading mathematician in the study of sea ice who works at the University of Utah. I love the line from the video: “People don’t usually think about mathematics as a daring occupation.” Ken and his team show that math can take you anywhere that you can imagine.

Bon appetit!

Reflection sheet – SquareRoots, Concave States, and Sea Ice

George Washington, Tessellation Kit, and Langton’s Ant

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch!

002What will you do with your math notebook at the end of the school year? Keep it as a reference for the future? Save it as a keepsake? Toss it out? Turn it into confetti? Find your favorite math bits and doodles and make a collage?

Lucky for us, our first president kept his math notebooks from when he was a young teenager. And though it’s passed through many hands over the years—including those of Chief Justice John Marshall and the State Department—it has survived to this day. That’s right. You can check out math problems and definitions copied out by George Washington over 250 years ago. They’re all available online at the Library of Congress website.

Or at least most of them. They seem to be out of order, with a few pages missing!

Fred Rickey

That’s what mathematician and math history detective Fred Rickey has figured out. Fred has long been a fan of math history. Since he retired from the US Military Academy in 2011, Fred has been able to pursue his historical interests more actively. Fred is currently studying the Washington cypher books to help prepare a biography about Washington’s boyhood years. You can see two papers that Fred has co-authored about Washington’s mathematics here.

Fred writes:

Washington valued his cyphering books and kept them as a ready source of reference for the rest of his life. This would seem to be particularly true of his surveying studies.

Surveying played a big role in Washington’s career, and math is important for today’s surveyors, too.

Do you have a question for Fred about the math that George Washington learned? Send it to us and we’ll try to include it in our upcoming Q&A with Fred!

A tessellation, by me!

A tessellation, by me!

Next up, check out this Tessellation Kit. It was made by Nico Disseldorp, who also made the geometry construction game we featured recently. The kit is a lot of fun to play with!

One thing I like about this Tessellation Kit is how it’s discrete—it deals with large chunks of the screen at a time. This restriction make me want to explore, because it give me the feeling that there are only so many possible combinations.

I’m also curious about the URL for this applet—the web address for it. Notice how it changes whenever you make a change in your tessellation? What happens when you change some of those letters and numbers—like bababaaaa to bababcccc? Interesting…

For another fun applet, check out this doodling ant:

Langton's Ant.

Langton’s Ant.

Langton’s Ant is following a simple set of rules. In a white square? Turn right. In a black square? Turn left. And switch the color of the square that you leave. This ant is an example of a cellular automaton, and we’ve seen several of these here on Math Munch before. This one is different from others because it changes just one square at a time, and not the whole screen at once.

Breaking out of chaos.

Breaking out of chaos.

There’s a lot that is unknown about Langton’s ant, and it has some mysterious behavior. For example, after thousands of steps of seeming randomness, the ant goes into a steady pattern, paving a highway out to infinity. What gives? Well, you can try out some patterns of your own in the applets on the Serendip website. (previously). And you can read some amusing tales—ant-ecdotes?—about Langton’s ant in this lovely article.

DSC03509I learned about Langton’s Ant from Richard Evan Schwartz in our new Q&A. In the interview, Rich shares his thoughts about computers, art, what to pursue in life, and of course: Really Big Numbers.

Check it out, and bon appetit!

Squaring, Water Calculator, and Snap the Turtle

Welcome to this week’s Math Munch!

I’ve been really into squares lately. Maybe it’s because I recently ran across a new puzzle involving squares– something called Mrs. Perkin’s quilt.

Mrs. Perkin's quilt 1

69 by 69 Mrs. Perkin’s quilt.

The original version of the puzzle was published way back in 1907, and it went like this: “For Christmas, Mrs. Potipher Perkins received a very pretty patchwork quilt constructed of 169 square pieces of silk material. The puzzle is to find the smallest number of square portions of which the quilt could be composed and show how they might be joined together. Or, to put it the reverse way, divide the quilt into as few square portions as possible by merely cutting the stitches.”

Mrs. Perkin's quilt 18

18 by 18 Mrs. Perkin’s quilt

Said in another way, if you have a 13 by 13 square, how can you divide it up into the smallest number of smaller squares? Don’t worry, you get to solve it yourself– I’m not including a picture of the solution to that version of the puzzle because there are so many beautiful pictures of solutions to the puzzle when you start with larger and smaller squares. Some are definitely more interesting than others. If you want to start simple, try the 4 by 4 version. I particularly like the look of the solution to the 18 by 18 version.

Mrs. Perkin's quilt 152

152 by 152 Mrs. Perkin’s quilt

Maybe you’re wondering where I got all these great pictures of Mrs. Perkin’s quits. And– wait a second– is that the solution to the 152 by 152 version? It sure is– and I got it from one of my favorite math websites, the Wolfram Demonstrations Project. The site is full of awesome visualizations of all kinds of things, from math problems to scans of the human brain. The Mrs. Perkin’s quilts demonstration solves the puzzle for up to a 1,098 by 1,098 square!

Next up, we here at Math Munch are big fans of unusual calculators. Marble calculators, domino calculators… what will we turn up next? Well, here for your strange calculator enjoyment is a water calculator! Check out this video to see how it works:

I might not want to rely on this calculator to do my homework, but it certainly is interesting!

Snap the TurtleFinally, meet Snap the Turtle! This cute little guy is here to teach you how to make beautiful math art stars using computer programming.

On the website Tynker, Snap can show you how to design a program to make intricate line drawings– and learn something about computer programming at the same time. Tynker’s goal is to teach kids to be programming “literate.” Combine computer programming with a little math and art (and a turtle)– what could be better?

I hope something grabbed your interest this week! Bon appetit!